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HP ProBook 450 G2 drivers

I recently changed my old laptop for a new HP ProBook 450 G2. The drivers installation on my Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit) were pretty straight forward, except for the following two devices which were shown as not supported in the Device Manager:

  1. Other devices -> Unknown device:
    Hardware Ids: ACPI\HPQ6007
    Device Instance Path: ACPI\HPQ6007\3&33FD14CA&0
    Parent: ACPI\PNP0A08\2&daba3ff&1
    
  2. Other devices -> PCI Data Acquisition and Signal Processing Controller:
    Hardware Ids:
    	PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_9C24&SUBSYS_2248103C&REV_04
    	PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_9C24&SUBSYS_2248103C
    	PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_9C24&CC_118000
    	PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_9C24&CC_1180
    Compatible Ids:
    	PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_9C24&REV_04
    	PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_9C24
    	PCI\VEN_8086&CC_118000
    	PCI\VEN_8086&CC_1180
    	PCI\VEN_8086
    	PCI\CC_118000
    	PCI\CC_1180
    Physical Device Object name: \Device\NTPNP_PCI0014
    Device Instance Path: PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_9C24&SUBSYS_2248103C&REV_04\3&33FD14CA&0&FE
    Parent: ACPI\PNP0A08\2&daba3ff&1
    

The first one turned out to be the driver for “HP 3D DriveGuard 6” which I didn’t install because my SSD drive won’t benefit from such a feature.

The second one was a more interesting case. It turns out that not all HP drivers were listed when I selected my operating system “Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit)” at the HP drivers website. I had to change the OS to “Microsoft Windows 7 Home Professional (64-bit)”, so that I get the option to download the “Intel Chipset Installation Utility” which resolved the missing drivers.

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KVM-Qemu Virtio storage and network drivers for 32-bit/64-bit Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP and Windows 2000

…bundled as ISO images, so that you can easily mount and use them in a KVM guest.

UPDATE: It seems that Fedora started to provide the latest drivers bundled as an ISO. Check the official Windows VirtIO Drivers page for links.


Download locations follow:

These are static ISO images, and I’ve built them by downloading the ZIP sources dated 24.09.2009 from the official WindowsGuestDrivers KVM page and then converting them to ISO image files by using K3b.

Note that Virtio provides noticeably faster disk and network access.

Please review the official page of Virtio for sample KVM command line arguments which set up Virtio storage and network devices. You may notice that there is an (undocumented) parameter “boot=on” specified for the “-drive” option. This “boot=on” parameter is vital for the “-drive” option, or else Windows 7 won’t like your drive and won’t install on it.

Note about Virtio storage drives and the Windows 7 installer
I was able to install Windows 7 right from the start by using a Virtio storage drive within the KVM guest. At first the Windows installer didn’t see the Virtio disk at all but there is an option to install additional storage drivers. I installed the Virtio Windows drivers from the above ISO images, the Windows installer detected the Virtio storage disk properly and everything went quite smooth afterwards.


Resources: